In this week’s roundup, we take a peek into a new procedure that may help fight obesity. We also take a look at topics such as vulnerable election systems, technology addiction, Amazon’s new surveillance product being sold to law enforcement agencies, and the debate over ethics and AI.

Industry Roundup is brought to you by UMBC’s Division of Professional Studies, offering a broad array of professionally-focused master’s degree and certificate programs that address industry needs while anticipating future opportunities.


New Procedure in the Makings to Help with Obesity

obesity

A team of researchers have pinpointed a revolutionary method of fighting obesity with a simple outpatient procedure that helps turn bad fat into good fat. It will not be a cure all method, but will likely compliment other weight-control approaches.


Washington Post Survey Indicates State Election Systems Were Vulnerable

With midterm elections getting closer, digital security experts warn that the current systems are not sufficiently protected against cyber threats. One hundred cybersecurity leaders weighed in on an informal survey and an overwhelming 95% of them agree, states aren’t prepared to defend themselves against cyber attacks.


Technology Addiction Debunked

industry roundup

We hear and see warnings all over the place about how we are hurting our personal and professional lives with our addictions to screen time. Is this panic being over-pumped into society? How big of a problem do we really have here? Are our brains being negatively affected by our technology? Is the addiction real? This article may put your heart (or brain) at rest. After all, as they state, “Technology is not a drug.”


Amazon’s Newest Service Being Sold to Law Enforcement Agencies – Surveillance

If this headline makes you nervous, read on. Amazon has developed a product called Rekognition. Yup, Amazon is now in the business of selling a powerful and dangerous new facial recognition system, and to law enforcement agencies.


Ethical Guardrails on Artificial Intelligence

Let’s face it, AI is not perfect. In fact, it’s far from that, dangerously so. Microsoft’s director of AI research experienced this firsthand when the autopilot on his Tesla failed to keep his car safely on the road. This kind of incident raises the ethical standard question about AI and whether it needs some boundaries set.


Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.